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Beo Crescent Food Centre

Top 10 Best Eats at Beo Crescent Food Centre

Situated in Bukit Ho Swee, Beo Crescent Market and Food Centre was constructed in 1965 on the location of the devastating fires in 1961. It began as an open market prior to being redeveloped into its existing form and shape. While the hawker centre is not as extensive or comprehensive as others, there are a variety of good food stalls, some with long lines. Individuals come for dishes such as lor mee, char kway teow and also fish soup, the Cantonese claypot rice is likewise a draw. Here’s our recommended top 10 must-try stalls at Beo Crescent~

Beo Crescent Food Centre


#1 – Chef Wang Fried Rice

Introduction:

The egg fried rice has a very wonderful fragrance to it. It is fried with a covering of eggs as well as some chopped springtime onions, providing it a wonderful golden yellow tone colour and also preferences suitable also. Their only gripe here is that the fried rice has excessive moisture as well as isn’t dry enough. They prefer the drier kind of fried rice. The egg fried rice shown above includes shrimp garnishes which tastes fairly fresh. Most definitely likeable.

A dish at Din Tai Fung that’s universally loved is their egg fried rice—made better if it’s topped with shrimps or a pork cutlet, doubly so if you can get it for cheap.

Menu Items:

  • Egg Fried Rice (Price $4)
  • Egg Fried Rice Sambal (Price $4.50)
  • Pork Rib Fried Rice (Price $6.50)
  • Pork Rib Fried Rice Sambal (Price $7)
  • Shrimp Fried Rice (Price $6.50)
  • Shrimp Fried Rice Sambal (Price $7)
  • Abalone Fried Rice (Price $10)
  • Sambal Abalone Fried Rice (Price $10)

Location: 38A Beo Crescent
#01-71 Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: NA

Website: https://the.fat.guide/singapore/eat/chef-wang-fried-rice/

 



#2 – Nan Yuan Fishball Noodle

Introduction:

Truly a traditional and value for money meal. If you’re anywhere near Beo Crescent and crave for fishball noodles go try this. For $3 or more you can the heritage food that lots of people talk about. There’s another stall in a coffee shop in Tiong Bahru but the queue is slower and value for money not too great. At $3 or more you get a bowl full of fishballs, big fish cake slices, a pork ball and fish dumpling.

Menu Items:

  • Dry Fishball Noodle (Price $6)
  • Mee Pok (Price $5.50)
  • Minced Meat Tah Mee (Price $5.50)

Location: 38A Beo Crescent
#01-68 Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: NA

Website: https://www.burpple.com/nan-yuan-teochew-fishball-noodle

 


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#3 – Loi Kee Cooked Food

Introduction:

Prawn noodles is primarily about the broth, and also Loi Kee does it fantastically. It’s briny, meaty and thick adequate to coat the coming with noodles. This prawn noodles comes with prawns, pork pieces, fish cake pieces as well as a piece pig skin, which is not so typically provided with prawn noodles. The yellow noodles comes with bean sprouts and also some vegetables in a bowl of prawn soup. Rather likeable as well as respectable flavours.

Menu Items:

  • Prawn Noodles (Price $5-$10)

Location: 38A Beo Crescent
#01-74 Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: NA

Website: https://www.burpple.com/loi-kee-cooked-food

 


Read Also:

Top 10 Best Claypot Rice in Singapore


#4 – Cantonese Claypot Rice

Introduction:

With well-seasoned rice, charred crispy bits as well as flavorful chunks of hen, Chinese sausage and salted fish, this is one strong serving of claypot rice that will leave you desiring much more. They usually add cabbage or leafy environment-friendlies, too, which rather ups the healthiness of the recipe. A substantial specific part retails for around $5, making it easy on the wallet and also helpful for solo restaurants. Various other menu things consist of claypot fish rice, claypot pork ribs rice and a variety of Chinese soups.

Menu Items:

  • Cantonese Claypot Rice (Price $4.30 onwards)

Location: 38A Beo Crescent
#01-66 Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: NA

Website: https://www.hawkerpedia.com.sg/en/article/cantonese-claypot-rice-beo-crescent

cantonese claypot rice beo crescent

 


#5 – Porridge Kiosk

Introduction:

Simple, comforting bowl, specifically for the heavy and also chilly downpours. Not the most excellent in flavours with its uncomplicated mix of century egg, lean pork/chicken, youtiao, shallots, as well as spring onion. However still highly satisfying given the silky and also smooth uniformity of the congee.

We also extremely suggest including an egg. It’s broken directly right into the dish before the steaming congee is poured over to slow down and prepare the egg with recurring warm. This developed a soft-boiled oozy uniformity that added a light egginess and creaminess to the total bowl.

Menu Items:

  • Century Egg Porridge (Price $3,$5 onwards)
  • Chicken Porridge (Price $3,$5 onwards)

Location: 38A Beo Crescent
01-86, Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: NA

Website: https://www.jointhawker.com/en/shops/36115

 



#6 – Heng Heng Cooked Food

Introduction:

For carrot cake, look to Heng Heng. The white variation offers a lighter taste, while the dark option is rich and also umami. In any case, the yam is bouncy, the eggs are velvety as well as both renditions have a wonderful wok hei. The steamed rice cake is cut into tiny items pan fried up until somewhat charred prior to eggs are included. It is after that topped with cut spring onions. The black selection has added wonderful black sauce added when it is being fried.

Menu Items:

  • Black & White Carrot Cake (Price $3 onwards)

Location: 38A Beo Crescent
01-72, Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: NA

Website: https://sg.openrice.com/en/singapore/r-heng-heng-cooked-food-tiong-bahru-chinese-r657

 


#7 – Ah Mei Handmade Noodles

Introduction:

Ah Mei Handmade Noodle does the typical array of handmade noodles consisting of mee hoon kway, ban mian, etc. This ban mian comes with a raw egg at the end of the bowl. Hot soup with ban mian is after that poured over it. The ban mian includes minced meat balls and veggies with crunchy ikan bilis as well as fried shallots covered on it. The ban mian is soft and slightly bouncy, fairly bland by itself but preferences decently wonderful when eaten with the savoury ikan bilis. The minced meat balls are soft with rather good flavours. As for the clear soup, it is lightly flavoured which is nice. This is rather a nice dish of ban mian.

Menu Items:

  • Ban Mian (Price $3.50 onwards)
  • Mee Hoon Kway (Price $3.50 onwards)

Location: 38A Beo Crescent
01-72, Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: NA

Website: https://findd.sg/listing/ah-mei-handmade-noodles.html

 


#8 – Da Shi Jie

Introduction:

The clanging of the wok and the aroma is currently a draw to Da Shi Jie’s char kway teow. It’s pleasant and fragrant, plus the quantity is generous for the rate. Include cockles for a delicious deepness. Their variation has a slightly wonderful touch as well as pleasing wok hei, and is a bit on the wetter side. You can anticipate to pay about $4 upwards, which is pretty reasonable.

Menu Items:

  • Fried Kway Teow (Price $4 onwards)

Location: 38A Beo Crescent
01-65, Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: +65 11111111

Website: https://www.burpple.com/f/GkiDN07U

Char Kway Teow from Da Shi Jie Fried Kway TeowThe char kway teow was moist, had a consistent flavour tasted rather eggy, which made it rather filling.

 


#9 – Kia Xiang Du Du Nyonya Kueh

Introduction:

Made fresh, they come filled with either peanut or coconut, yet they believe you’ll want the peanut filling since it is utterly impressive. The rice flour was nice and company; a little crunchy however still soft. It held its form rather well, which is an indicator of a well-crafted kueh du du. Tucking in, you’ll feel a delightful crunch from the little peanut bits, prior to a fragrant nuttiness spreads in your mouth as you eat.

Menu Items:

  • Tu Tu Kueh Big (Price $0.80 onwards)
  • Tu Tu Kueh Small (Price $2 onwards)

Location:38A Beo Crescent
01-88, Beo Crescent Market & Food Centre
Singapore 169982

Contact: 

Website: https://www.facebook.com/kiaxiangdudu

 


#10 – Kim Kitchen Braised Duck

Introduction:

Kim Kitchen is run by a young hawker who specialises in Teochew-style duck. He braises the poultry long and slow with dark soy and spices, and plates it over rice or noodles. Pork also gets the same treatment, as do the eggs, tofu and innards for kway chap.

Menu Items:

  • Braised duck from $3 to $12.

Location: 38A Beo Crescent,
#01-82, Beo Crescent Market Market,
Singapore 169982

Contact: NA

Website: None

 


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