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Is Your Headache Related to Your Eye Strain?

Do you get a headache that seems to be getting worse as you continue to stare at your computer screen? Eye strain is a common and uncomfortable symptom which can be caused by a variety of factors. In the post-COVID environment, many of us are spending more time in front of a computer screen. Prolonged periods of starting at a computer screen can lead to eye strain. Eye strain can then lead to a headache, although this does not always happen. Other eye issues, such as a dry eyes, degenerative eye diseases and uncorrected near-sightedness or farsightedness can also cause headaches. In this comprehensive guide by Tropika Club, we will explore the types of eye strains and how they can lead to headaches. We will also recommended ways to treat such headaches.

1. What are the types of Eye Strains?

Eye strains are usually considered as a symptom (rather than condition) arising from a set of activities or causes. While some people do not easily develop eye strains, others can easily develop eye strains from their activities. There are many kinds of activities that can lead to eye strains, which then develop into a headache or even migraine. Usually, the victims of eye strains are those that sit and stare at computer screens for extended periods. Others may develop eye strain from the wrong spectacle prescription, or having too much or too little light in the environment. The types of eye strains are as follows:

  • Watery eyes
  • Blurry vision
  • Sore eyes
  • Watery eyes

2. Are Headaches caused by Eye Strains?

Headaches can be a result of eye strains. Generally, any eye problem will cause discomfort or irritation in the eye or eyes, which in turn causes headaches. It is important to note, though, that most headaches are not the result of eye strains. Very often, headaches could be tension-related headaches that has little to do with one’s vision. In addition, headaches that occur when one wake up from sleep or rest are also not due to eye strains. Lastly, people with primary headache disorder such as migraine or tension-type headaches are not caused by eye strains.

Notwithstanding, very occasionally, headaches can be caused by the following eye strains or eye-related issues:

  • if you have injuries to your cornea or corneas
  • if you have an eye infection
  • if you have dry eyes or your tear ducts are not producing enough tears
  • If you have an acute attack of glaucoma
  • If you have uncorrected nearsightedness or farsightedness

3. Is Your Headache Caused by Something Else?

There is an assortment of headaches which may not be caused by eye strains, such as the ones below:

  • Migraine – Migraine is a neurological condition that can cause multiple symptoms. It’s frequently characterised by intense, debilitating headaches. Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, difficulty speaking, numbness or tingling, and sensitivity to light and sound. Migraines often run in families and affect all ages.
  • Tension – Tension headaches occur when neck and scalp muscles become tense or contract. The muscle contractions can be a response to stress, depression, head injury, or anxiety. They may occur at any age, but are most common in adults and older teens.
  • Cluster – Cluster headaches are a series of relatively short but extremely painful headaches every day for weeks or months at a time. You tend to get them at the same time each year, such as the spring or fall. Because of their seasonal nature, people often mistake cluster headaches for symptoms of allergies or business stress.

The exact cause of these headaches are unclear at the moment, and can be credited to a variety of factors.

4. How to Deal with Eye Strain

Eye strain is a common problem today. Prolonged exposure to books, computer screens and electronic devices can cause eye strain that may result in headaches, dry or watery eyes and eye irritation. To relieve eye strains, you can do the following:

  • Eye massage – A special massage called Shiatsu can help rejuvenate and “restore” the area around eyes to its initial state. Shiatsu differs from other types of massage because its only movements are pressing certain dots on the face. It is mostly performed by Japanese women and perhaps that’s the secret of their beauty and youth. Place your index fingers on the spots, warm up the zone a bit, press, and release. You can pull the muscles toward the temples slightly, not taking your fingers off. Pay attention to ensure that it’s the muscles and not the skin that is being pulled.
  • Warm compress – A warm compress is a great way to relax your eye muscles and relieve dry eyes after a long day of staring at computer screens and books. For this method, dip a soft, clean cloth into warm water and find a comfortable place to lie down. Close your eyes and place the warm cloth over your eyelids. Relax and take deep, relaxing breaths for 1 minute. Repeat this process at least three times.
  • Aloe Vera – It’s safe to use aloe vera gel on the outside of your eyelids to relieve redness or swelling. Just be careful not to get any of the gel in your eyes and don’t apply it too close to the edge of your eyelid. Avoid rubbing your eyes if you apply aloe vera to your eyelids and only use a small amount
a man holds his head while sitting on a sofa

5. How to Deal with Headaches

The best way to get rid of a headache quickly may depend on what’s causing it and what type of headache it is. A primary headache is caused by overactivity or problems with the pain-sensitive structures in your head, according to the Mayo Clinic. Common types of primary headaches include migraine attacks and tension headaches. Here are some of the methods to treat headaches without the use of medication:

  • Drink lots of water – Drinking enough water may help prevent headaches or reduce their severity. Dehydration can be an underlying cause of many simple headaches. It may also alter how a person feels, acts, or thinks. As a study in the journal Antioxidants notes, even slight dehydration may alter how people think and function, making them feel worse, with or without a headache. Water may help make someone in this situation feel better, although some studies are more cautious.
  • Cold compress – A cold compress may be a simple headache solution that many people have on hand. Applying an ice pack or another cold item to the head or neck may help constrict the blood vessels and reduce inflammation in the area. Doing so could temporarily relieve headache pain.
  • Remove any possible pressure on the head – Sometimes, there is a physical reason for a headache. Check for anything that is putting too much pressure on the head. This may be a ponytail or bun that is too tight or a hat or headband that has been on too long.
  • Get some rest – Different issues may lead to headaches, and sleep problems are among the more common ones. Getting too much or too little sleep or not sleeping soundly may influence a headache in some people, as they have not fully rested their body.
  • Try acupuncture – Acupuncture is part of traditional Chinese medicine, where practitioners place small needles into the surface of the skin. The aim is not to cause pain but to stimulate the body’s own energy.

Tropika Club's Flamingo is the chief editor and curator for all newsfeeds, articles and guides for Tropika Club Magazine. Beside contributing content to the magazine, the Flamingo also helps to give our reward points to customers who have booked beauty, wellness and fitness services in the search directory.