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Singapore Buddhist Temples

Top 10 Singapore Buddhist Temples to Visit as a Tourist

Buddhist temples in Singapore are some of the most popular tourist destinations, with visitors coming from all over the world to see these beautiful religious buildings. The temples are often brightly coloured and feature intricate carvings and paintings. There are also many holy artifacts on display, such as golden Buddhas and sacred texts. Visitors can explore the temples either on their own or join a guided tour.. There are many temples in Singapore, each with its own unique story and significance. Here are the ten best temples to visit if you’re looking for a spiritual experience.

Singapore Buddhist Temples

#1 – Buddha Tooth Relic Temple

Introduction:

Located in the historic district of Chinatown, the Buddha Tooth Relic Temple & Museum’s richly designed interiors and comprehensive exhibits on Buddhist art and history tell stories of culture over thousands of years old. Built in 2007, the temple gets its name from what the Buddhists regard as the left canine tooth of Buddha, which has been recovered from his funeral pyre in Kushinagar, India and displayed on the temple’s grounds.

About

  • This Tang-styled Chinese Buddhist temple was conceptualized and designed by the temple’s Chief Abbot Venerable Shi Fa Zhao, with the help of local and overseas consultants. It costs S$75 million to set up, and is based on various elements of Tang Dynasty architecture. The building’s design was inspired by the Buddhist Mandala, a symbol of Buddhist culture that represents the universe.

Opening Hours:

  • 9AM – 5PM

Location & Address: 288 South Bridge Rd, Singapore 058840

Contact: +65 6220 0220

Website: Website Link Here

 


#2 – Thian Hock Keng Temple

Introduction:

Built in 1839 with the support of prominent members of the Hokkien community, such as philanthropist Tan Tock Seng, Thian Hock Keng Temple is Singapore’s oldest Chinese temple.

Dedicated to Mazu, the Goddess of the Sea, early Chinese immigrants came here to give thanks for their safe passage across the vast waves of the South China Sea.

The temple even attracted the attention of the Qing Emperor Guang Xu, who presented a calligraphy plaque with the phrase bo jing nan ming (‘Gentle Waves Over the South Seas’ in Chinese) in 1907. It is now permanently exhibited at the National Museum of Singapore

About

  • At the temple, take in the remarkable architecture in the traditional southern Chinese style. Keep an eye out for the detailed carvings and sculptures of dragons, phoenixes and deities, as well as the colourful broken porcelain on the roof ridges, a Fujian decorating technique. Amazingly, not a single nail was used in the original construction of the temple, which is now a gazetted national monument and managed by the Singapore Hokkien Huay Kuan.

Opening Hours:

  • 7.30AM – 5.30PM

Location & Address: 158 Telok Ayer Street, Singapore 068613

Contact: +65 6423 4616

Website: Website Link Here

 


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#3 – Lian Shan Shuang Lin Monastery

Introduction:

The origin of Lian Shan Shuang Lin Monastery can be traced to Hokkien merchant and community leader Low Kim Pong’s meeting with 12 Buddhist monks and nuns in 1898. Low invited the Buddhists to stay in Singapore to spread the Buddhist faith. Low subsequently provided 50 acres of land for a monastery, and the Chinese community from other parts of Singapore also began raising funds for the monastery’s construction.

About

  • The monastery was modelled after the fifth-century Yi Shan Xi Chan Monastery in Fuzhou. The bell and drum towers are possibly the only ones of their kind that still exist in Singapore, and enshrine the Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva and Guan Gong respectively. For their historical and architectural value, the Halls of Celestial Kings and Mahavira Hall were gazetted as a National Monument in 1980. Today, Lian Shan Shuang Lin Monastery stands as Singapore’s oldest Buddhist monastery.

Opening Hours:

  • 8AM- 5PM

Location & Address: 184 Jalan Toa Payoh, Singapore 319944

Contact: +65 6259 6924

Website: Website Link Here



#4 – Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery

Introduction:

Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery (KMSPKS) is a spiritual sanctuary in urban Singapore where one can learn the Buddha’s teachings of wisdom and compassion; practise mindfulness; develop gratitude and bring happiness to all. 

Founded in 1921, KMSPKS is one of the first traditional Chinese forest monasteries in Singapore.  Today, the monastery sits on 75,470 square metres – equivalent to the size of almost 11 football fields – and is one of the most significant and renowned monasteries in Southeast Asia. Over the years, we have grown dynamically in Dharma propagation, community involvement and religious harmony efforts. Today, we are a community of Buddhists who come together to learn, practise and share the teachings of the Buddha.

About

  • The Buddhist College of Singapore (BCS)  founded by Ven Sik Kwang Sheng in 2005, is an institution for Sangha’s higher Buddhist education. Located within the premises of KMSPKS, it offers both BA and MA Degree programmes in English and Chinese.

Opening Hours:

  • 8AM – 4PM

Location & Address: 88 Bright Hill Rd, Singapore 574117

Contact: +65 6849 5300

Website: Website Link Here

 


#5 – Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple

Introduction:

The temple has existed since 1884 at its present location with a reconstruction in 1895. The original temple was an example of Chinese temple architecture and traditional craftsmanship. In its vicinity were other places of worship such as the adjacent Sri Krishnan Temple, Church of Saints Peter and Paul at Queen Street, Maghain Aboth Synagogue and the Malabar Jama-ath Mosque. The original temple, entry was gained across a large sheltered courtyard through a porch and screened anteroom. The main hall then contained three altars, the central one for the Kuan Yin and one each for Bodhidharma (the founder of Zen Buddhism) and Hua Tuo, a Chinese patron saint of medicine and healing on the flanking altars.

About

  • In 1982, the temple was extensively rebuilt as it needed to increase its capacity due to the high number of worshipers at the temple. All deities were enshrined on a single altar in the prayer hall with the elevated statue of Sakyamuni Buddha placed behind Kuan Yin. The relative positions of other deities remain unchanged. A large space of two separate roofs of different height. The entrance wall is a large central gateway flanked by two smaller ones and colours are rich in golden yellows, reds, blues and greens. At the ends of all the roof rafters, there are yellow Buddhist swastikas on a green ground.

Opening Hours:

  • 7AM – 12.15PM, 1 – 6.15PM

Location & Address: 178 Waterloo St, Singapore 187964

Website: Website Link Here

 


#6 – Wat Ananda Metyarama Thai Buddhist Temple

Introduction:

Founded in the 1920s, Wat Ananda Metyarama Thai Buddhist Temple is one of the oldest Thai Theravada Buddhist temples in Singapore. Originally situated at 83 Silat Road, it was renovated in 1953 under the then-abbot Venerable Phra Rajayankavee, with further renovations as well as new construction between 1975 and 1997 under present-day abbot Venerable Chao Khun Phra Tepsiddhivides. In the 21st century, the monastery underwent a major construction exercise which concluded with a brand new building at 50B Jalan Bukit Merah in 2014.

About

  • On 5 January 2014, the new extension were officially opened by Indranee Rajah. The new building features a Dhamma hall, Meditation hall, Cultural center (museum), conference room, dining hall, rest area, Sunday classroom, and the monks’ abode. The new Julamanee Prasat Theravada Columbarium was opened on 15 June 2014 at the temple.

Opening Hours:

  • 6Am – 7PM

Location & Address: 50B Jalan Bukit Merah, Singapore 169545

Contact: +65 6276 9646

Website: Website Link Here

 


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#7 – PlaSakya Muni Buddha Gaya Templece 7

Introduction:

The Sakya Muni Buddha Gaya Temple has its origins in 1927 when a Thai monk, the Venerable Vutthisasara, erected a temporary shelter made of zinc and wooden planks along Race Course Road to house a statue of Buddha that he had carried to Singapore. Its name refers to the Buddha who was also known as Shakyamuni or Siddhartha Gautama.The temple grew in popularity and, in 1930, Vutthisasara built the present temple building with a donation from Aw Boon Haw and Aw Boon Par, brothers best known for developing the Tiger Balm ointment. The temple is 15 metres tall and houses a 300-ton statue of Buddha. The statue is surrounded by a seemingly endless chain of lights, leading to the temple’s popular name, “Temple of a Thousand Lights”.

About

  • According to the temple, it also houses an ebony and mother-of-pearl replica of Buddha’s footprint and a piece of bark from the original Bodhi tree under which Buddha sat. This replica of the footprint was found on top of Adam’s Peak in Sri Lanka, a mountain named after the belief of ancient seafaring Arabs that its summit housed the first man Adam’s crypt. The temple’s architecture reflects an eclectic mix of Chinese, Thai, and Indian cultural influences.

Opening Hours:

  • 8AM – 4.30PM

Location & Address: 366 Race Course Rd, Singapore 218638

Contact: +65 6294 0714

Website: Website Link Here

 


#8 – Burmese Buddhist Temple Singapore

Introduction:

This refreshing grand Burmese Buddhist Temple (BBT) is a relocation of the much smaller temple previously at 17 Kinta Road, Singapore.The BBT organization was founded in 1875 by a Burmese gentleman U Thar Hnin. In 1907, U Kyaw Gaung, also known as Khoo Teogou, a Burmese practitioner of traditional medicine and a native of Burma, became the first trustee of the Temple.From its modest beginning of a small temple at Kinta Road, the temple began to gradually grow in stature as a result of the untiring effort of U Kyaw Gaung.

About

  • The temple conducts year-round events and structured programmes for the public, such as Dhamma classes, religious festivals and Burmese traditional celebrations like New Year Celebration (Thingyan).The temple’s operation is almost entirely funded by donations and contributions-in-kind from the public. It is managed by the Management Committee of about 15 part-time volunteers, headed by an elected President, whilst the Resident Monks act as Advisers to the committee, and provide the spiritual needs and religious services to devotees.This unique and dignified temple not only becomes a religious landmark, but is also declared as a national heritage site of Singapore.

Opening Hours:

  • 12PM – 6PM

Location & Address:  14, Tai Gin Road, Singapore 327873

Contact: +65 6521 1717

Website: Website Link Here

 


#9 – Hai Inn Temple

Introduction:

Hai Inn Temple is standing unassumingly on top of a hill; amidst the serenity of the greenery. It is located in the outskirts of Choa Chu Kang, near the exit of Kranji Expressway (KJE).Hai Inn Temple had a humble beginning; from mud huts to the majestic building. This was only made possible by a well-known pioneer businessman, Mr Tan Fang Swee who generously donated the piece of land and Mrs Tan, Madam Yeo Tong Ho, who enduringly raised funds to commence the construction of the Hai Inn building.

About

  • Hai Inn Temple was built around 1928, during that time, Hai Inn Temple was comprised of numerous mud huts. It served its purpose of providing shelter against inclement weather. It was a place solely for the female laities and devotees to learn and practice dharma. Under the leadership of Madam Yeo and the devotees’ unyielding efforts, Hai Inn Temple’s reputation has proliferated far and wide.

Opening Hours:

  • 9AM – 5PM

Location & Address: 33 Brickland Road Singapore 688254

Contact: +65 6769 1515 / +65 6769 4743

Website: Website Link Here

 


#10 – Leong San See Temple

Introduction:

The Leong San See (meaning ‘Dragon Mountain Gate’) Temple is a Buddhist temple situated along Race Course Road in the Little India area. The temple was established as Leong San Lodge in 1913 by Reverend Chun Wu in memory of the original Leong San Temple in the An Ping District of Fujian Province, China, and dedicated to Guanyin, the Goddess of Mercy.

About:

  • New buildings were added to the lodge in 1926 with renovation works carried out in 1930, 1962 and 1970. The architectural style of the temple was modelled after that of a Chinese-style palace, with dragons and a blazing pearl adorning the roof. In 1925, the temple’s then abbot, Venerable Sek Kong Hiap (1901-1994), set up the Leong San School (later renamed the Mee Toh School, meaning ‘School of Eternal Brightness’) near the temple.

Opening Hours:

  • 9AM – 3PM

Location & Address: 371 Race Course Rd, Singapore 218641

Contact: +65 6298 9371

Website: Website Link Here

 


Have a Place to Recommend?

We need your help! Do you know any other noteworthy places that deserve to be added to this list? If so, do write to us via our email at [email protected]. Tropika Club will do a review of your recommendations and update the list accordingly.


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